see me learn to code.

Standard

see me try.
see me fail.
see me fix.
see me learn to code.

It’s no secret that today’s language is not always spoken, but rather read, perceived, taken in visually and interactively. We should have known when New York Mayor Bloomberg vowed to learn to code in 2012 that, as oddly misconceived as that promise might have been, it’s clear that the ubiquity of websites, apps, and SaaS is here to stay and grow.

I’ve been blogging for something like 12 years, only seriously in the last few, and used to build incredibly simplistic “websites”–I use that term very loosely–around my childhood interests, such as ballet and.. uh.. ‘NSync. If only I could remember those verbose Angelfire URL’s, I’d spend the next hour chuckling over my precocious geekiness and lamenting my desire to leave it behind.

My interests have always been a balance of creativity and the technological, but lately I’ve received more work in website development than anything else. I’ve decided..

it’s time to learn to actually code.

Not hack away, but actually hack. Not copy and paste CSS solutions over one another, but actually understand what CSS stands for, means, does, how it works.

It’s time to learn to develop my own highly customized blog themes, both for my personal recipe blog, The Stylist Quo, my daily dinner ideas blog, What to Make for Dinner Tonight, and for my clients. It’s time to find a niche, be serious, and think about actually making this a thing. After all, coding is so satisfyingly logical! It’s beyond useful, and it can provide the vehicle for me to develop any one of the ideas I have that gently fizzle out as I wait to find the “right” developer, as I wait for him or her to understand my vision, my anxiousness to get it made and out there.

It’s something I can (and should) teach my children, but mostly.. it’s kind of fun. A lot of fun, sometimes. Sometimes, it’s horrible, yes, but sometimes.. it’s kind of fun. It just so happens to be ridiculously useful.

So far, my plan is to use a mix of the following resources and apps:

  • Team Treehouse, the silver plan, an interactive project-based video coding school focused almost entirely on web development
  • lynda.com, the “regular” plan, a video-based school based on teaching digital creative skills, anything from CSS to how to use an iPhone..
  • Codecademy, a free online interactive project-based coding school
  • LightBot, an iOS app that teaches programming logic to kids. NO JUDGMENT. It’s loads of fun
  • Google-sourced articles and blogs to satisfy questions of principle and comparison that come up along the way
  • Good, old-fashioned experience in my own blog and side project development

Here we go.